Traditional vs. Renovationist

Here is the difference between Traditional and Renovationist regarding liturgics.


Traditional:
The Church's system of liturgical services (i.e., the Typicon) is the divinely inspired mature growth of the Apostolic embryo. The full flower of God's revelation to His people as embodied in the Divine services organically emanated from the seed of the early Church.

Renovationist:
The Typicon as we know it today has become somewhat unintelligible and tremendously cumbersome; for it is encrusted with layers of extraneous and repetitive material that reflect a significant shift away from, and degeneration of, the worship forms of the early Church
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Traditional:
We should have faith in Divine Providence and that the same Spirit who "guides us into all truth" also ordains the Church's order of worship.

Renovationist:
The liturgical services mainly represent the product of a "naked chain of events," or historical cause and effect.   The Holy Spirit does not ensure that our rites are kept pristine. 


Traditional:
The fourth century (in the wake of the "Peace of Constantine") saw a Spirit-guided organic development in the Divine services, as confirmed by the witness of the Church's consciousness in the following centuries up through our present day.

Renovationist:
The fourth century saw a "break," or "abrupt shift" in the system of services resulting in "deviations" from the purity of the  Apostolic era due to the overlaying of Hellenistic "strata" and the synthesis of new and conflicting "liturgical pieties."

Traditional:
Our Task:  to understand and grasp this revelation of God to His people as contained in the Divine services.  This requires humility and ascetic struggle with a view towards purifying our hearts.

Renovationist:
Our Task:  to figure out what has gone wrong with our liturgical services and "fix the many problems" with them.  This requires a spirit of doubt and suspicion, as well as heavy reliance upon Western scholarship.

source: http://orthodoxinfo.com/phronema/ph_services.aspx

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